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                  We are pioneering a new era of microbiome-based precision medicine.

                  uBiome is the leading microbial genomics company.

                  We allow healthcare providers, patients, and citizen scientists to learn about the human microbiome with unprecedented accuracy and speed.

                  Our awards

                  This year’s WSJDLive features technology leaders, entrepreneurs and policymakers from around the world discussing the opportunities and challenges presented by the rapidly-changing world of tech

                  CNN’s close look at 30 innovative companies that are changing the world; uBiome selected in the Futurist Category

                  CNN 10: Start-ups to Watch

                  uBiome Ranked #6 for Most Innovative Companies in the Healthcare Category

                  Business Insider: 30 Under 30

                  Elle women in tech

                  Final 4 finalist; AdvaMed 2015 is the culmination of a year-long collaboration of the leading players in the MedTech Industry to foster innovations that improve value and address some of healthcare’s biggest challenges

                  Technology Winner; Recognizing outstanding achievement in the fields of technology, film, and design

                  Selected to join Nominet Trust 100, a project to find and recognize the most inspiring applications of digital technology for social good

                  Selected as a Technology Pioneer by the World Economic Forum in 2018

                  Our story

                  uBiome was founded in 2012 by Stanford-, Oxford-, and UCSF-educated researchers.

                  Our Scientific Advisory Board includes Dr. George Church (leading geneticist at Harvard University) and many other leading scientists.

                  We are funded by Y Combinator, 8VS, OS Fund, and other leading investors.

                  uBiome has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Healthcare (Fast Company), Top Prize at the IVY Awards, CNN 10: Startups To Watch, and chosen as a Technology Pioneer by the World Economic Forum in 2018

                   

                  Nov 2012

                  uBiome founded with crowdfunding campaign for the uBiome IRB-approved microbiome study, raising more than $350,000.

                  Summer 2014

                  uBiome receives Series A funding from Y Combinator and Andreessen Horowitz.

                  May 2015

                  uBiome has academic partnerships with leading institutions around the world, including Harvard, Stanford, UCSF, University College London, the National University of Singapore, and the Garvan Institute of Australia.

                  Nov 2015

                  uBiome announces research partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study hospital-acquired infections in 10,000 people.

                  May 2016

                  uBiome Publishes Peer-Reviewed Scientific Paper in PLOS ONE on First Version of Technology for Gut Health Screening Test.

                  Aug 2016

                  uBiome lab certified by College of American Pathologists, placing it in the top 3% of laboratories worldwide.

                  Nov 2016

                  uBiome closes Series B funding round led by 8VC, supported by other leading investors.

                  Nov 2016

                  uBiome launches SmartGut, world’s first sequencing-based clinical microbiome test, providing patients and healthcare providers with actionable insights to improve gut health.

                  Nov 2017

                  uBiome launches SmartJane, world’s first sequencing-based vaginal microbiome test, providing patients and healthcare providers with actionable insights to improve women’s health.

                  uBiome in the media

                  For recent media highlights, view our media kit

                  uBiome’s social mission

                  uBiome’s mission is to advance the science of the microbiome and make it useful to people. Through our research with thousands of citizen scientists and dozens of universities, including Harvard, Stanford, UCSF and others, we have gathered millions of data points and built a set of tools that have enabled us to create clinical tests for healthcare providers and patients.

                  For people

                  We are committed to empowering people to understand and take greater control of their health. Through our uBiome Explorer kits and our microbiome database – the largest in the world – we give people access to tools to better understand the microbiome.

                  For science

                  To advance the science of the microbiome, we work with over 1,000 researchers from around the world at institutions such as Harvard, Stanford, UCSF, University College London, and the National University of Singapore.

                  For the world

                  We also work with over 150,000 citizen scientists in more than 80 countries. Our projects include large-scale citizen scientist studies, partnerships with researchers and organizations, and support for underfunded scientific discovery via our $1 million Microbiome Impact Grant Initiative (as part of the White House National Microbiome Initiative).

                  support image

                  Support

                  Our customer support team is available by email and is happy to answer any questions you have about sampling, results, and more.

                  FAQs

                  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

                    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

                    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

                     

                    What are probiotics?

                    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.” ?

                    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

                     

                    Probiotic Foods

                    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

                    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus – ?is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

                    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

                    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

                    Probiotic-rich foods include:

                    • Yogurt
                    • Pickles
                    • Sauerkraut
                    • Kimchi
                    • Kombucha
                    • Miso
                    • Kvass
                    • Cottage cheese
                    • Many more!

                     

                    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

                    Explorer? identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

                     

                    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

                    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

                    *All posts must tag @uBiome?and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry.?The?first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1.?The?Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.? Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for?the?Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15.?The?Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
                  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

                    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

                    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

                     

                    What are probiotics?

                    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.” ?

                    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

                     

                    Probiotic Foods

                    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

                    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus – ?is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

                    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

                    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

                    Probiotic-rich foods include:

                    • Yogurt
                    • Pickles
                    • Sauerkraut
                    • Kimchi
                    • Kombucha
                    • Miso
                    • Kvass
                    • Cottage cheese
                    • Many more!

                     

                    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

                    Explorer? identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

                     

                    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

                    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

                    *All posts must tag @uBiome?and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry.?The?first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1.?The?Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.? Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for?the?Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15.?The?Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
                  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

                    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

                    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

                     

                    What are probiotics?

                    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.” ?

                    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

                     

                    Probiotic Foods

                    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

                    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus – ?is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

                    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

                    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

                    Probiotic-rich foods include:

                    • Yogurt
                    • Pickles
                    • Sauerkraut
                    • Kimchi
                    • Kombucha
                    • Miso
                    • Kvass
                    • Cottage cheese
                    • Many more!

                     

                    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

                    Explorer? identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

                     

                    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

                    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

                    *All posts must tag @uBiome?and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry.?The?first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1.?The?Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.? Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for?the?Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15.?The?Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
                  • Probiotic Foods: The Good Bugs

                    When you think of gut health, your mind may jump straight to the word “probiotic.” This isn’t surprising; a Google Trend Report indicated that consumer demand for probiotics has increased significantly since 2004.

                    Additionally, since the mid-1990s, research has suggested that probiotics may “aid digestion and help maintain gut health.”

                     

                    What are probiotics?

                    The World Health Organization defines probiotics as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.” ?

                    According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, probiotics may help your body find the proper balance of microorganisms and “stabilize the digestive tract’s barriers against undesirable microorganisms.”

                     

                    Probiotic Foods

                    Probiotics aren’t only available in supplement form. Many delicious foods are naturally full of probiotics!

                    Yogurt, for example, is produced when a starter culture of bacteria – usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus – ?is added to milk. The bacteria break down the lactose sugars into lactic acid.

                    Pickling is a time tested technique for preserving vegetables and fruits. While pickling can involve immersing produce in vinegar to kill all the bacteria, a similar outcome can result from immersing produce in salted water for several weeks. In that briny environment, the Lactobacillus bacteria that naturally occurs on produce like cucumbers have a chance to produce lactic acid, which serves as a preservative.

                    Another common category of probiotic-rich foods is fermented foods. Foods ferment when molds, yeasts, or bacteria produce enzymes that break down the food into smaller, simpler compounds. The fermented foods are often abundant in probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Pediococcus, and Weisella.

                    Probiotic-rich foods include:

                    • Yogurt
                    • Pickles
                    • Sauerkraut
                    • Kimchi
                    • Kombucha
                    • Miso
                    • Kvass
                    • Cottage cheese
                    • Many more!

                     

                    Curious if the probiotic bacteria in the food you’re eating is making its way to your gut?

                    Explorer? identifies microbes found in the most common probiotic foods and lets you see how your levels of these microbes compare to others who consume these foods.

                     

                    Use the code UNLEASH at checkout to get 50% off a Gut Explorer kit through the end of February 2019.

                    If you’ve used Explorer and have a story to tell, we’d love to hear from you! Share your story on social tagging @ubiome and #UnleashYourExplorer. You’ll be entered for the chance to win 1 Gut Explorer kit each week during February and for the Grand Prize Drawing: a Gut Time Lapse set.*

                    *All posts must tag @uBiome?and use #UnleashYourExplorer to be counted as a valid entry.?The?first weekly contest will run Friday 2/1 to Thursday 2/14. Entries must be received by 11:59pm PST on Thursday 2/1.?The?Grand Prize contest will run Friday 2/1 – Thursday 2/28.? Entries must be received by 11:59 PST on Thursday 2/28 for?the?Grand Prize. Weekly winners will be announced at 10:00am PST on Friday 2/15.?The?Grand Prize winner will be announced by 10:00am PST on 3/1/2019.
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